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Cinnamon As Spice And Alternative Medicine

Cinnamon is widely used both in the food and pharmaceutical industry because of its antiseptic properties. The cinnamon bark oil is used as a flavoring for digestive aids, liniments, and oral care products. It is also used in many perfumes, soaps, and lotions. In addition, cinnamon leaf oil is used in the food industry as flavorings to candies, sauces, and pastries. The commonly used ingredient is actually the soft, inner bark of the cinnamon tree. This spice is now being heralded as the latest in the long line of herbal medicine wonders? According to research findings, one teaspoon of cinnamon contains 28 milligrams of calcium, one milligram of iron, fiber, and vitamins C, K, and manganese.

The use of cinnamon dates back in Chinese medicine to 2800 BC, and is known as “kwai” in the Chinese language. Ancient Egyptians used it in the embalming process of corpses because of its fragrance. Medieval physicians used this spice to treat coughs, hoarseness, sore throats, and other types of infections. Cinnamon also has antibacterial and inflammatory properties that help reduce joint and muscle pain, especially the discomforts associated with arthritis. Many health specialists advice diabetics to take daily dose of cinnamon to regulate blood sugar levels.

It can also benefit one's health by improving the body's digestive system and relieve many stomach discomforts. In aromatherapy, cinnamon oil is used to stimulate and warm the senses, restore vigor, and treat stress and anxiety. Cinnamon oil is also important in strengthening the immune system because its scent is said to treat early stages of cold and fever. The oil of cinnamon is also used as a physical and emotional stimulant, with many believing that it can actually enhance one's libido. Medical research also indicates that the scent of cinnamon may reduce drowsiness, irritability, pain, and frequent migraines. In some studies, the essential oil provides relief to tight muscles, ease painful joints, and relieve menstrual cramps in women. Cinnamon also increases the action of enzymes that break down the food in the body and help improve one's metabolism. Here are the other health benefits of Cinnamon: · Studies have shown that just 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon included in a daily diet can lower cholesterol. · Cinnamon may have a regulatory effect on blood sugar, making it especially beneficial for people with diabetes. · Cinnamon has shown an amazing ability to stop medication-resistant yeast infections.

· A study released by researchers at the U. Department of Agriculture in Maryland showed that cinnamon reduced the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells. · It has an anti-clotting effect on the blood. · When added to food, it prevents bacterial growth and food spoilage, making it a natural food preservative. · Smelling cinnamon may boost cognitive function and memory. · Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices. Indeed, cinnamon has many benefits that can be used to improve one's health and well-being. If taken together with a balanced, healthy diet and plenty of exercise --- one can bring back the spice of life that everyone longs for.


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